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Posts Tagged ‘mango’

Photo by Karen Knauff

I like to think outside the box when it comes to food; this dish has Thai and Indian elements. One might not expect flavors from across the Bay of Bengal to marry well, but seared salmon rubbed with garam masala was delicious when paired with jasmine rice cooked in coconut milk with mangos, cilantro, and peas. I finished the dish finished with a rich curry-coconut sauce.

Ingredients:

  • Box of jasmine rice (white rice will work)
  • 1 can of coconut milk
  • salt
  • ¼ cup of chopped dried mangos or fresh
  • 1 lemon
  • Cilantro
  • Frozen peas
  • 1 tablespoon of unsalted butter
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • Pepper
  • 1 teaspoon of curry powder
  • Cinnamon
  • Salmon filets (Follow Trader Joe’s thawing directions)
  • Garam masala (my version had coriander, chilies, cinnamon, cardamom, cumin, and cloves—The five Cs)
  • Cooking oil

Pour the contents of a box of rice into a medium saucepan. My jasmine rice called for two cups of water, so I used a cup of coconut milk, a cup of water, and a pinch of salt. Follow the cooking direction and start rehydrating the dried mangos in a pan with a ½ cup of water, over medium heat. Remove from the heat when they are soft. This is not necessary if you have fresh mangos.

When the rice is finished, add the juice of half a lemon, mangos, chopped cilantro, thawed peas, and salt to taste.

For the sauce, sweat the minced shallots and garlic in butter with salt and pepper. When they are fragrant and soft, add the remaining coconut milk. Finish with curry powder, lemon juice, and cinnamon. I chose to strain out the garlic and shallots for a cleaner looking sauce. Reheat when the salmon is finished.

For the salmon, salt and pepper the flesh and massage with plenty of garam masala. Get a nonstick pan very hot and pour on a thin layer of canola or olive oil. Sear the filets skin-side down first. Also, start the thick piece first and watch the side until almost all the flesh has lightened in color. Flip and cook the spiced side for a minute, being careful not to burn the spices.

When the fish is firm and flaky, serve immediately over a mound of coconut rice and spoon over the coconut curry sauce. Garnish with cilantro leaves and serve right away.

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Ingredients:

  • chicken thighs with bone and skin
  • mango nectar
  • cream coconut
  • cilantro
  • duck sauce
  • Coconut rum

1. I basted the chicken breasts with a Wegmans basting oil. It had grape-seed oil, canola oil, parsley, and garlic. I recommend the product—it’s great with bread too. Brush both sides with oil, salt, and pepper and sear in a slightly oiled pan, skin down. You should hear sizzling and crackling. Do not move the breasts for about five minutes until the skin is brown and crispy. Flip the chicken and cook the opposing side.  I added some cayenne pepper, onion, and black pepper.  Place in a 375º oven for about 30 minutes.

2. Reduce mango nectar with some chopped cilantro for 5-10 minutes. Mix in two big tablespoons of cream of coconut—this will melt—and a splash of coconut rum. Pour in about 1/2 cup of duck sauce—this is a great thickener and sweetener.

3. Use half of the glaze to coat the chicken and finish it in the oven. Allow the glaze to cool, so it thickens, and pour over the chicken when it is cooked. Finish with some sea salt and garnish with chopped cilantro.

I did not measure my ingredients, because it is important to adjust them to one’s taste. Everyone asked what was in the sauce and my cousin finished the leftovers with a spoon. I hope you enjoy this simple recipe.

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This was the first course of a five course meal that I prepared for my friends. The theme was class, sophistication, and elegance. This dish embodies them all. Served in a Martini glass, this salad is colorful, light, and refreshing.

  • Cut the avocados, mangos and tomatoes into similar sized cubes. A good ratio is 1:1:1. This will yield mostly mango, some avocado, and a little tomato. This creates the best balance. They should be, at most, half of an inch in length, width, and height.
  • Make sure that the fruits are as ripe as possible. Ripe mangos are usually a bit yellowish in color, tender to the touch, and fragrant. The avocado flesh should give a little when pressed, yet should not feel mushy. After this test, take the stem off the avocado; if the flesh is a green color, you’re in business.
  • Make a dressing by chopping a large handful of fresh cilantro very well. Add 1/4 to 1/2 a cup of Extra-virgin olive oil and the juice of one lime (The zest is a great addition as well). Season with salt and pepper and, for sweetness, add 1-2 tablespoons of honey or agave syrup.
  • Slowly add the dressing to the salad, while mixing. It is important that the dressing only coats the fruits. Serve in an elegant cup and wow your guests. Heck, put some on a burger and eat it, alone, in your underpants.

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