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Poached eggs look so much nicer than any other type and they are the most pure in flavor. Without ever touching a pan, they can be cooked more evenly without tasting bitter and turning brown.

1. Boil water in a sauce pan and add a teaspoon of white vinegar; this causes the egg whites to congeal faster. Crack the eggs into individual ramekins, so that one bad egg doesn’t spoil the lot.

2. Bring the water to a simmer and add the eggs without crowding them. Sometimes, I use a ladles to hold my egg, so fewer whites can escape, but they seem to turn out well drifting unchaperoned in the water.

3. Time for 3 1/2 minutes; this will be sufficient to completely cook the whites, but leave the yolks completely oozy. The safe zone is 3-4 minutes.

4. I prefer mine on a bed of spinach, mushrooms, and onions sautéed in olive oil with garlic—add a dab of butter at the end. Use any toast you have on hand, it’s fun to make new combinations.

My sister said: “What’s the point of eating poached eggs. They’re mushy and disgusting”. That may be true for some, but to others, poached eggs mean a new level of sophistication, compared to over-easys. In the former, a  gently swipe of the fork will open the purse of yolks instead of sawing to puncture the unyielding whites of the latter. Plus, the silky yellow yolk flows down into the spinach and toast rather than pooling on the plate, causing one to chase after it with bread in hand. Finally, just the appearance of the egg: sitting with dignity on a throne of spinach raised even higher by a toasty foundation. However, some do prefer to have their egg flat against the plate, shunned to the side by a preeminent slab of home-fries.

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